Corbitt's National Parks
     Keweenaw
               National Historical Park


                



1992: National Historical Park

Size: 1,869 acres

2008 visitors: Not reported

Stamp: ?


Rating (1-5): Unrated

About the Site

Copper has been mined here on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan for over 7,000 years. It was first the Native Americans who discovered the rich copper ore, and fashioned it into jewelry and tools and trade items. When Europeans arrived, they quickly realized the importance of the area, and copper mining boomed. From the 1840's to 1968, more than 11 billion pounds of copper was shipped from the Peninsula. This Copper Country accounts for about 80% of all the copper found in the world today. Whoa! I didn't know that!

Keweenaw is dedicated to the nationally historic and culturally important sites of the Keweenaw peninsula. It's made up of several non-traditional units; or, in other words, the National Park Service doesn't run the joint. Sure there are two main units to the Park, Calumet and Quincy, but there are many more that work together as Keweenaw Cooperating Sites. Some are privately owned, some are run by the state. Keweenaw National Historical Park, along with its cooperating sites, strives to interpret the "historic synergism between the geological, aboriginal, sociological, cultural, technological, and corporate forces that relate the story of copper on the Keweenaw Peninsula." As with other units within the National Park Service system, this park has been established "for the education, benefit and inspiration of present and future generations."

What You're Going to See

The three areas Congress was most concerned with are the Village of Calumet, the former Calumet & Hecla (C & H) Mining Company's properties, and the former Quincy Mining Company properties. Cooperating sites stretch along a 100-mile run of the Peninsula. They include: the A.E. Seamen Mineral Museum, the Calumet Theatre, the Copper Range Historical Museum, the Coppertown USA Museum, the Delaware Mine, the Fort Wilkins State Park, the Hanka Homestead, the Houghton County Historical Museum, the Keweenaw County Historical Society, the Keweenaw Heritage Center at St. Anne's, the Laurium Manor Inn, McLain State Park, Old Victoria, Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine, and the Upper Peninsula Fire Fighters Memorial Museum.

The area offers many attractions, including auto touring, backpacking, biking, bird watching, boating, camping, cross country skiing, dogmushing, fishing, hiking, hunting, interpretive programs, kayaking, nature walks, scuba diving, snorkeling, snow skiing, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, stargazing, swimming, exploring the wilderness area, and wildlife viewing.

Personal Observations

Not yet, but someday ...

Getting There

Visitor Information Desk in Hancock, Michigan -- From Grand Rapids, take US 131 north for 66 miles to Reed City and the US 10 junction. Take US 10 east for 40 miles to the junction with US 127. Take US 127 north for 49 miles until it merges with I-75. Continue north on I-75 for 90 miles to the toll bridge. After the 5-mile bridge, go west on US 2 for 66 miles to Blaney Park. Take highway 77 north for 17 miles to Seney. Take highway 28 west for 80 miles to Marquette. Take US 41 west for 53 miles to the merger with US 141, and continue north on US 41 for 57 miles to Houghton. Go through Houghton, and keep on US 41 across the bridge. It'll take you right into Hancock. Continue on for about three miles, and the Quincy Mine Hoist Visitor Information Center is between Sing-Sing Rd. and First Av., at 49750 U.S. Highway 41.

From Minneapolis-St. Paul, take I-35 north for 137 miles to Duluth. Take US 2 southeast across the water to Superior, Wisconsin and on to Wentworth; that's about 12 miles. Continue on eastward on US 2 for 102 miles to Wakefield, Michigan. Take Highway 28 east for 41 miles to Bruce Crossing and the junction with US 45. Take US 45 north for 58 miles to Houghton. Go through Houghton, and keep on US 41 across the bridge. It'll take you right into Hancock. Continue on for about three miles, and the Quincy Mine Hoise Visitor Information Center is between Sing-Sing Rd. and First Av., at 49750 U.S. Highway 41.

Park Headquarters in Calumet, Michigan -- Follow the above instructions. Starting in Hancock, go north on US 41 for about 11 miles, to Calumet. Turn left onto Red Jacket Road; the address is 25970 Red Jacket Road, Calumet.

Nearby Attractions

To the east is Isle Royale National Park, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, and Grand Portage National Monument.